Grief and Loss Resources

The National Alliance for Grieving Children (NAGC) is a nonprofit organization that raises awareness about the needs of children and teens who are grieving a death and provides education and resources for anyone who supports them. Through the collective voice of our members and partners we educate, advocate and raise awareness about childhood bereavement. The NAGC is a nationwide network comprised of professionals, institutions and volunteers who promote best practices, educational programming and critical resources to facilitate the mental, emotional and physical health of grieving children and their families. 

The Shared Grief Project envisions a world where no child grieves alone. To achieve this, we share the stories of individuals who have experienced a major loss at an early age and have gone on to live healthy, happy and successful lives.

The Coalition to Support Grieving Students is a unique collaboration of the leading professional organizations representing classroom educators (including teachers, paraprofessionals, and other instructional staff), principals, assistant principals, superintendents, school board members, and central office staff, student support personnel (including school counselors, school nurses, school psychologists, school social workers, and other student support personnel), and other school professionals who have come together with a common conviction: grieving students need the support and care of the school community.

The Moyer Foundation is a public, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to provide comfort, hope and healing to children and families affected by grief and addiction.

The National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement (NCSCB) at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work is dedicated to helping schools support their students through crisis and loss.

For many young children, grief, the intense set of feelings associated with death, is temporarily interrupted by a normal feeling state, only to be replaced again by grief a few hours, days, or years later. Teachers or other adults may tell you that children “should be over” their grief, but grief is an ongoing process.